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Project Poster
:
(PP13): OCRE Cloud Benchmarking Validation Test Suite
Project Poster Authors
Event Type
Project Poster
Passes
Tags
Clouds and Distributed Computing
Containerized HPC
Performance Analysis and Optimization
Performance Tools
Reproducibility
TimeWednesday, June 19th3:15pm - 4pm
LocationBooth N-230
DescriptionHelix Nebula Science Cloud (HNSciCloud) developed a hybrid cloud linking commercial cloud service providers and research organisations in-house resources via the GÉANT network. The hybrid platform offered data management capabilities with transparent data access, accessible via eduGAIN and ELIXIR AAI systems.
The OCRE (Open Clouds for Research Environments) project will leverage the experience of HNSciCloud in the exploitation of commercial cloud services, currently being considered by the European research community as part of a hybrid cloud model to support the needs of their scientific programmes.
To ensure that the cloud offerings conform to the tender requirements and satisfy the needs of the research community, OCRE is developing a cloud benchmarking validation test suite. The test-suite leverages on the testing activities of HNSciCloud where a group of ten Research organisations (CERN, CNRS, DESY, EMBL-EBI, ESRF, INFN, IFAE, KIT, SURFsara and STFC) representing multiple use cases from several scientific domains, have put together more than thirty tests. These provide functional and performance benchmarks in several technical domains such as: compute, storage, HPC, GPUs, network connectivity performance, and advanced containerised cloud application deployments. The test-suite will be used to validate the technical readiness level of suppliers, in order to check whether these meet the community's requirements as stipulated in the OCRE tender specification. This tool is being designed to be as modular and autonomous as possible, using an abstraction layer based on Docker and Kubernetes for orchestration, using Terraform for resource provisioning, pushing the results to an S3 bucket at CERN.